CITIS 2018-2019

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V International Conference on Science, Technology and Innovation for Society (CITIS 2018-2019)

The V International Conference on Science, Technology and Innovation for Society, CITIS 2018-2019, held from February 6 to 8, 2019 and organized by Universidad Politécnica Salesiana, offered the national and international academic community a unified communication platform, aimed at cover the theoretical and practical problems with greatest impact on modern society through an engineering perpective.

In this edition, dedicated to the 25 years of life of La Salesiana, the thematic axes were related to the application of science, technological development and innovation in five fundamental pillars of our society: Industry, Mobility, Environmental Sustainability , Information and Telecommunications.

The scientific committee consisted of 48 researchers from ten countries: Spain, United Kingdom, Italy, Belgium, Mexico, Venezuela, Colombia, Brazil, United States, and Ecuador.

Almost one hundred contributions were received, of which 39 were approved as formal research papers and 15 in poster format. These contributions were presented orally to the entire academic community that met at the conference, who from the Aula Magna, the Auditorium and the Multipurpose Room respectfully fulfilled the responsibility of representing the entire Society in the review, acceptance and validation of the new knowledge that was presented in each presentation by the researchers.

In parallel to the technical sessions, the conference had presentation spaces for scientific posters and five workshops on avant-garde themes that captivated the attention of our teachers and students. Also, in the framework of the event a total of eight Keynote Conferences were given on current topics such as knowledge management at the University-Ecosystem, the challenges and opportunities of Industry 4.0, the advances of basic and applied research in mechatronics for the study of new generation robots, optimization in engineering with multi-objective techniques, the development of advanced networks in Latin America and the universe, air pollution due to vehicular traffic, radon and the risks that this radioactive gas represents for human health, among others.

But CITIS was not only science and research, as the workshops, keynote conferences and technical sessions were complemented by artistic, cultural and recreational activities. It is worth highlighting among them: the Guayaquil cultural afternoon, the photographic exhibition with augmented reality animation “France in motion” and the exhibition of the Robotics Club of the UPS Sede Guayaquil with mechatronic prototypes developed by our students that have been multi-awarded in national and International events.

Proceeding: http://dspace.ups.edu.ec/handle/123456789/17843


WORKSHOPS

WORKSHOP 1: SETTING OF PID CONTROLLERS THROUGH MULTI-OBJECTIVE TECHNIQUES

It is possible to consider the task of setting PID-type controllers as an optimization problem. Typically, this is done by carrying out the optimization of a performance index (also known as a cost function or design objective). However, it could happen that the optimal solution found does not satisfy the exchange of benefits of all the control requirements. This workshop addresses this optimization problem from a multi-objective approach, where a set of Pareto-optimal solutions are calculated. The foregoing provides the engineer with alternatives for the selection of the solution most suited to their needs, following a process of multi-criteria analysis of the exchange of benefits between conflicting objectives.

Objectives: The participant will understand the design process through multi-objective optimization as a holistic design technique for engineering, where the definition of the multi-objective problem, the multi-objective optimization phase and decision making converge. This technique will be used for the adjustment of PID type controllers.
Required skills: management and programming of Matlab (elementary).

Required knowledge: Optimization (elementary), PID controllers (elementary).

In the workshop, contents of the book: G. Reynoso Meza, et al. “Controller Tuning with Evolutionary Multiobjective Optimization.” (2017). Intelligent Systems, Control and Automation series. Editorial Springer, will be covered.

Also will be covered referential content from the book (in edition): G. Reynoso Meza. “A gentle introduction to engineering design with multiobjective optimization.”

Instructor: 

PhD. Gilberto Reynoso Meza – Escola Politécnica, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Paraná (PUCPR), Brasil

Gilberto Reynoso Meza received his PhD (2014) in Automation, Robotics and Industrial Computing from the Universitat Politècnica de València (Spain), and the titles of master of science with a specialization in automation (2005) and mechanical engineer administrator (2001) from Tecnológico de Monterrey (Mexico). He is affiliated to the Postgraduate Program in Engenharia de Produção e Sistemas (PPGEPS), of the Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Paraná (PUCPR), Brazil. He is currently developing his research in the development of multi-objective optimization techniques for engineering design and machine learning for industrial processes. His main research interests are computational intelligence, intelligent control, multi-objective optimization, multi-criterion decision making, evolutionary algorithms and machine learning.


WORKSHOP 2: CLOUD COMPUTING AND DATACENTERS

The participants in this workshop will get a panoramic view of the data centers, that is, the technological infrastructure that supports cloud computing. Cloud computing is defined as a model that offers on-demand computing services, such as:

  1. SaaS (Software as a service), model that provides software applications for end users via the Internet: e-mail, office automation, storage, etc.

  2. PaaS (Platform as a service), a model that provides platforms for the development of software via the Internet as programming languages ​​and libraries.

  3. IaaS (Infrastructure as a service), a model that provides the physical infrastructure that in turn allows PaaS and SaaS to be supported, such as servers, networks and computer laboratories via the internet, supported in Data Centers.

Finally, the IEEE Cloud Computing initiative is addressed, as well as industry trends in data centers and the main industry standards. At present, ICT graduates find employment in data centers and network operations centers in telecommunications suppliers.

Instructor: 

Prof. José Ignacio Castillo Velázquez – Universidad Autónoma de la Ciudad de México (UACM)

J. Ignacio Castillo has been working for 19 years in IT&C industries [Datacenter Dynamics, RedUno-TELMEX, IFE, DICINET], as well as in private and public universities as professor [UDEFA, UACM, BUAP, UPAEP, UTM]. He has participated in more than 40 national and international projects as a team member, or leader on technical and management positions. Castillo is an IEEE Senior Member. He participates with ISO/IEC 27000 committee, Mexican NB. As professor he has lectured more than 100 undergraduate and graduate courses, he wrote journal and conference papers, one book, technical reports and is referee for magazines and conferences; he organized national and international conferences and seminars. He had offered more than 60 keynote, invited talks and webinars, but also he wrote more than 100 divulgation articles for magazines and newspapers.
Since 2008 Castillo is a tenured Professor at Electronics & Telecommunications Dep. with Universidad Autónoma de la Ciudad de México UACM (Autonomous University of Mexico City). He received his B.Sc. degree in Electronic Sciences (95), completed with honors, and his M.Sc. degree in Semiconductor Devices (98) both from the Autonomous University of Puebla, Mexico.


WORKSHOP 3: SUSTAINABLE MOBILITY: ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL EVALUATION OF VEHICLES

There is currently a great concern about the differences between fuel consumption and actual emissions shown by vehicles and those reported by manufacturers. These differences generate important errors in emissions inventories and in the formulation of public policies for the control of vehicle emissions.
This workshop will illustrate how energy and environmental performance of vehicles is evaluated for regulatory purposes. Subsequently, the existing tools to estimate the energy consumption and emissions of vehicles under particular conditions of a region of interest will be shown. Finally, these tools will be used to estimate the number of batteries required in electric vehicles.

Instructor: 

PhD. José Ignacio Huertas Cardozo – Tecnológico de Monterrey, México

Dr. José Ignacio Huertas is a tenured professor at Tecnológico de Monterrey and a researcher at the research group on energy and climate change. He graduated as Mechanical Engineer at the Universidad de los Andes, Colombia (1988). Also he obtained a Master’s Degree in Mechanical Engineering from the Universidad de los Andes (1990) and from the University of Washington, St. Louis, USA (1994). He holds a Doctor of Science from the University of Washington (1997). He belongs to the CONACYT National System of researchers, level 1, in Mexico, and is also a senior researcher at COLCIENCIAS in Colombia. He is a member of the Mexican Academy of Sciences. He led the Energy Research Group (GICOM) of the Universidad de los Andes in Colombia from 1998 to 2002. In 2004 he founded the Automotive Mechatronics Research Center (CIMA) of Tecnológico de Monterrey and led it until 2015. He has published 3 books, 6 book chapters and more than 50 articles in indexed magazines related to energy and air pollution. He has a patent granted and also a copyright. He has completed more than 90 research and technological development projects financed by companies and government entities in Colombia, Mexico, Spain, France, USA. He has graduated 89 Masters and 6 PhDs. Research areas: Energy, combustion, vehicular emissions and air pollution.


WORKSHOP 4: CONCEPTUALIZATION AND DESIGN OF MECHATRONIC PRODUCTS

What makes new technological products to have better benefits, to be more competitive, and still continue to be attractive and effective in the market? New products are generally planned from the concept, and parametric and functional specifications are then defined according to the behavior and maturity of the target market niche as well as its segmentation. These problems are usually addressed at a managerial and industrial engineering level, but today they may be also aproached from the mechatronic engineering perspective. In this context, this workshop will address the essential aspects that influence the definition, generation and selection of the concept as a basis for new competitive products, particularly from the closed loop mechatronic design paradigm. This paradigm seeks to establish the causality of each and every one of the design and functionality elements that define and prioritize prototype features, and how they evolve towards a competitive product in the market. We will deepen in technical aspects of functional definition of the product, as well as the techniques of concept, modeling, design, sensors, actuators (and their control), protocol tests, project management, up to the product cycle. We present several case studies, and organized in teams, we will develop design proposals for a mechatronic product, in a hypothetical but realistic environment.

Instructor: 

Dr. Vicente Parra Vega – Research Center for Advanced Studies (Cinvestav), México

Dr. Parra-Vega has developed extensive research, teaching and academic-administrative experience at graduate level in the field of robotics, mechatronics and control, as well as founder and co-founder of two graduate programs, all within Cinvestav. After graduating from University of Tokyo in 1995, he has received extensive international training, including a research stay at the National Laboratory of Mechanical Engineering of Japan and the Robotics Lab of Ritsumeikan Univ. both in 1998, postdoctoral leave at German Aerospace Center in 2000, and a sabbatical leave in Univ. of Texas in 2011, as well as over additional other 10 international research stays. He has advised 36 graduate theses, among them 10 PhD, and has published over 230 original research peer-review articles in journals, book chapters, and in prestigious international conferences (collecting +1000 citations, of which +225 are type A cites). Dr. Parra has attracted funds for 15 research projects with national and international agencies, 11 as PI. His research areas are robot control theory (passivity-based, adaptive, sliding modes, fractional, and neurofuzzy), multirobot systems (teleoperation, cooperative, and robotic hands), human physical interaction (brain robot interfaces, haptic interfaces and cognitive load assessment), and non-inertial robot (aerial, submarine and mobile), and closed-loop mechatronics. Over the years, he has directed research and development of over 30 experimental robotic prototypes. Dr. Parra is member of SNI of Mexico since 1990, and Regular Member of the National Academy of Science of Mexico since 2003.


WORKSHOP 5: OPTIMIZATION OF CONVERTER TOPOLOGIES WITH SILICON CARBIDE DEVICES FOR ELECTRIC TRACTION SYSTEMS

The proposed workshop comprise the study and analysis of different topologies of three-phase converters used in electric traction systems. The first part contemplates a complete revision of the topologies of converters with VSI voltage source, CSI current and with impedance networks (Z, Qzsi). All these topologies are contemplated for their implementation in electric traction systems. The second part of the workshop deals with the use of silicon carbide (SiC) devices in the topologies named above. The use of SiC devices allows to work with higher switching frequency, greater operating temperature range and reduced power losses, which means an increase in the inverter system efficiency. The main objective in this second topic is to show the advantages and disadvantages of using this technology in this type of converters and how it is possible to get an optimization in size, weight and efficiency. This has undoubtedly generated expectation among manufacturers and research groups dedicated to electric traction. Within the whole subject, different modulation techniques used in the present are analyzed, and also specific control topics used for these topologies of inverters and electric motors are discussed.

Instructor: 

PhD. Efrén Fernández Palomeque – Universidad del Azuay, Ecuador

He is a specialist in electric traction systems for hybrid and electric vehicles. He got a degree in Electronic Engineering at Universidad del Azuay, has a specialization in Autotronics from the University of Buenos Aires (Argentina), holds a Master’s degree in Industrial Control and Automation from ESPOL, and is also a PhD in Electronic Engineering in the area of electric traction systems from the Universidad Politécnica de Cataluña (Spain). He has served as a professor at Universidad Espíritu Santo, Universidad Internacional del Ecuador and Universidad Politécnica Salesiana at its headquarters in Cuenca. He is currently a professor at Universidad del Azuay and a collaborator of the Motion Control and Industrial Applications Research Group (MCIA) of Universidad Politécnica de Cataluña where he collaborates with technology transfer projects. In addition, he is Technical Trainer of Cise Electronics (United States), Technical Advisor of EAATA Company (Barcelona, Spain) and founder of the Ecuadorian brand Dr. Ecus Solutions. He has represented Ecuador in different international congresses and has several publications in journals related to the area of electric mobility and topology optimization of converters in electric traction. He has 10 years of experience in the development and implementation of projects focused on electronic systems in automobiles and optimization in the conversion of conventional automotive systems to electric ones.



KEYNOTE SPEAKERS 

Dr. Vicente Parra Vega – Research Center for Advanced Studies (Cinvestav), México 

Dr. Parra-Vega has developed extensive research, teaching and academic-administrative experience at graduate level in the field of robotics, mechatronics and control, as well as founder and co-founder of two graduate programs, all within Cinvestav. After graduating from University of Tokyo in 1995, he has received extensive international training, including a research stay at the National Laboratory of Mechanical Engineering of Japan and the Robotics Lab of Ritsumeikan Univ. both in 1998, postdoctoral leave at German Aerospace Center in 2000, and a sabbatical leave in Univ. of Texas in 2011, as well as over additional other 10 international research stays. He has advised 36 graduate theses, among them 10 PhD, and has published over 230 original research peer-review articles in journals, book chapters, and in prestigious international conferences (collecting +1000 citations, of which +225 are type A cites). Dr. Parra has attracted funds for 15 research projects with national and international agencies, 11 as PI. His research areas are robot control theory (passivity-based, adaptive, sliding modes, fractional, and neurofuzzy), multirobot systems (teleoperation, cooperative, and robotic hands), human physical interaction (brain robot interfaces, haptic interfaces and cognitive load assessment), and non-inertial robot (aerial, submarine and mobile), and closed-loop mechatronics. Over the years, he has directed research and development of over 30 experimental robotic prototypes. Dr. Parra is member of SNI of Mexico since 1990, and Regular Member of the National Academy of Science of Mexico since 2003.

“Basic and Applied Research in Mechatronics for the Study of New Generation Robots”

For decades, the technology of manipulative robots has materialized, first as a proof concept in research laboratories and later in the manufacturing industry and high added value services. Its growth has determined the industrial robotics sector to become an important indicator of economic development of nations. However, it was in this last decade when a new class of robots broke into the international market, particularly in emerging industries. What made this possible? What kind of knowledge and technology enabled such a technological revolution? In this brief talk, we discuss some fundamentals and essential aspects of robotics, and the benefit of addressing their problems from the mechatronics. In particular, some problems of basic and applied research of emerging robots (which, unlike industrial robots, do not comply with ISOs) that are already on the market, will be deepened. We will briefly discuss recent problems and results of concurrent engineering research and mechatronics, which have contributed substantially to the advent of this generation of robots. Finally, some open problems that transcend the state of art and define the future of this technology are pointed out.


PhD. Gilberto Reynoso Meza – Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Paraná (PUCPR), Brasil

Gilberto Reynoso Meza received his PhD (2014) in Automation, Robotics and Industrial Computing from the Universitat Politècnica de València (Spain), and the titles of master of science with a specialization in automation (2005) and mechanical engineer administrator (2001) from Tecnológico de Monterrey (Mexico). He is affiliated to the Postgraduate Program in Engenharia de Produção e Sistemas (PPGEPS), of the Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Paraná (PUCPR), Brazil. He is currently developing his research in the development of multi-objective optimization techniques for engineering design and machine learning for industrial processes. His main research interests are computational intelligence, intelligent control, multi-objective optimization, multi-criterion decision making, evolutionary algorithms and machine learning.

“An introduction to engineering optimization with multi-objective techniques”

Many of the engineering problems are modeled as an optimization problem, typically by mean of a performance index (cost function or objective). However, it may happen that the optimal solution to be found does not satisfy the engineer / designer in charge.
Then,what to do then when an “optimal” solution is not enough? This talk addresses this problem from a multi-objective approach, where a set of Pareto-optimal solutions are calculated. The above means that given two (or more) conflicting design objectives, a set of optimal solutions is calculated, with different degree of compromise between the design objectives. This strategy provides the designer with alternatives for the selection of the solution that best suits their needs, following a multi-criteria analysis process. A general perspective of the design process will be provided through multi-objective optimization, presenting it as a holistic design technique, where the definition of the problem, the optimization phase and decision making converge.


PhD. José Ignacio Huertas Cardozo – Tecnológico de Monterrey, México

Dr. José Ignacio Huertas is a tenured professor at Tecnológico de Monterrey and a researcher at the research group on energy and climate change. He graduated as Mechanical Engineer at the Universidad de los Andes, Colombia (1988). Also he obtained a Master’s Degree in Mechanical Engineering from the Universidad de los Andes (1990) and from the University of Washington, St. Louis, USA (1994). He holds a Doctor of Science from the University of Washington (1997). He belongs to the CONACYT National System of researchers, level 1, in Mexico, and is also a senior researcher at COLCIENCIAS in Colombia. He is a member of the Mexican Academy of Sciences. He led the Energy Research Group (GICOM) of the Universidad de los Andes in Colombia from 1998 to 2002. In 2004 he founded the Automotive Mechatronics Research Center (CIMA) of Tecnológico de Monterrey and led it until 2015. He has published 3 books, 6 book chapters and more than 50 articles in indexed magazines related to energy and air pollution. He has a patent granted and also a copyright. He has completed more than 90 research and technological development projects financed by companies and government entities in Colombia, Mexico, Spain, France, USA. He has graduated 89 Masters and 6 PhDs. Research areas: Energy, combustion, vehicular emissions and air pollution.

“Air pollution near roads: an experimental and numerical simulation study using CFD”

Seeking to advance the understanding of the dispersion of pollutants near vehicular roads, the conference will address the results of an experimental study that measured vehicular traffic, relevant meteorological parameters and the concentration of particulate matter (TSP, PM10 and PM2.5), simultaneously, in different spots of two unpaved roads, located on flat terrain in a region without any relevant additional source of contaminants. With these data an air quality model to simulate the dispersion of particulate material and gaseous pollutants emitted was implemented through a commercial software of computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The results of this research can be used to determine the size of areas impacted by vehicular roads, identify mitigation measures, adapt and improve the accuracy of emission factors.


Prof. José Ignacio Castillo Velázquez – Universidad Autónoma de la Ciudad de México (UACM)

J. Ignacio Castillo has been working for 19 years in IT&C industries [Datacenter Dynamics, RedUno-TELMEX, IFE, DICINET], as well as in private and public universities as professor [UDEFA, UACM, BUAP, UPAEP, UTM]. He has participated in more than 40 national and international projects as a team member, or leader on technical and management positions. Castillo is an IEEE Senior Member. He participates with ISO/IEC 27000 committee, Mexican NB. As professor he has lectured more than 100 undergraduate and graduate courses, he wrote journal and conference papers, one book, technical reports and is referee for magazines and conferences; he organized national and international conferences and seminars. He had offered more than 60 keynote, invited talks and webinars, but also he wrote more than 100 divulgation articles for magazines and newspapers.
Since 2008 Castillo is a tenured Professor at Electronics & Telecommunications Dep. with Universidad Autónoma de la Ciudad de México UACM (Autonomous University of Mexico City). He received his B.Sc. degree in Electronic Sciences (95), completed with honors, and his M.Sc. degree in Semiconductor Devices (98) both from the Autonomous University of Puebla, Mexico.

“Advanced Networks in Latin America and the worlds”

This talk offers a panoramic view of advanced networks or what we know as Internet 2 both on the ground and on the interplanetary internet. On the one hand, Internet 2 is interconnected worldwide under the name of academic networks, whose requirements are a speed and a backbone infrastructure of high-performance switches and routers, and on the other hand, interplanetary Internet is developed as part of the colonization of Mars and other planets. Today, all commercial internet provider companies use IPV4 tunnelled with IPV6 or directly implementations with IPV6, and in fact IPV6 was developed in the advanced network environment, as well as a variety of protocols and services that are subsequently implemented in the commercial Internet. Advanced networks should be strategic for every country, Germany for example and start with the construction of your Internet 3.


PhD. Tony Jesús Viloria Ávila – Universidad Politécnica Salesiana, Ecuador

Professor Viloria is a Physicist, Master of Physics and Doctor of Physics and Mathematics at the State University of Belarus, Minsk. He was a professor and researcher at the University of Zulia, Venezuela, from 1993 to 2015. Among the subjects he has taught are: Nuclear Physics, Atomic Physics, Quantum Mechanics, Mathematical Methods for Physicists, Differential Calculus, Comprehensive Calculus, Linear Algebra and Applied Statistics. It is part of the Salesian Polytechnic University of Ecuador in its Headquarters of Cuenca from 2015 to date. He has published his scientific contributions in numerous congresses and journals of high scientific impact. His research interests include the numerical simulation of detection of ionizing radiation and radioactive materials of natural origin.

“radon, a real risk to mankind”

This talk will address the issue of environmental pollution of a radiological nature, and very specifically due to radon-222. This is an element cataloged by WHO as carcinogen, and is the leading cause of lung cancer worldwide among non-smokers. It is estimated that in United States an average of 21,000 people die annually from lung cancer induced by this gas, while in Spain they die annually close to 2000. In Latin America, studies on the subject are still very scarce. This talk will show some results of studies carried out in the R&T laboratory of the Universidad Politécnica Salesiana, in regard to the radiological risk to which the inhabitants of the city of Cuenca, Ecuador, are exposed.


PhD. Mariela Cerrada Lozada – Venezuela

Systems Engineer and Master in Control Engineering by the Universidad de Los Andes, Merida, Venezuela, PhD in Automatic Systems by the National Institute of Applied Sciences, Toulouse-France. Mariela has more than 24 years of academic and research experience, reported in more than 100 scientific papers at congresses, book chapters and high-impact journals in the field of intelligent systems-based industrial supervision. She was a professor at the Control Systems Department at the Universidad de Los Andes in Merida, Venezuela, where she reached the highest academic rank of full professor. In the years 2014-2015 and 2016-2017was a Prometeo researcher in the Research and Development Group in Industrial Technologies (GIDTEC) of the Universidad Politécnica Salesiana Cuenca Headquarters, and is currently teaching Mechatronics course at The Engineering Faculty in Salesiana.

“Industry 4.0: Challenges and Opportunities”

Since the first industrial revolution, technological advances have generated the pronounced growth of industrial productivity to reach the automated industry in the 1970s. In recent decades, advances in mobile communication and information technology have placed us in the middle of a fourth wave of technological advance, which has led to the digital transformation of the industry: the Connected Industry, or also called Industry 4.0, where sensors, machines and information systems can be connected throughout the entire value chain to achieve an intelligent industry focused on the product and the customer. However, the mere connection is not enough. Digitization of the industry is only an enabler of other analytical and reasoning processes that lead to an integrated, efficient and flexible industry to produce high quality goods at reduced costs. In this sense, the Industry 4.0 paradigm proposes challenges on how to apply and implement such processes along the value chain. Similarly, the development of Industry 4.0 offers opportunities to achieve sustainable manufacturing in different areas of the production process: in business models, networks of value creation, in the model of the organization, in human resources, as well as in the processes and products. Thus, there are challenges and opportunities that must be understood in each context, which allows even small and medium-sized industries to begin to move the path towards Industry 4.0.


PhD. Mónica Huerta – Universidad Politécnica Salesiana, Ecuador

She is an electronic engineer and has a Master`s degree in Biomedical Engineering, both degrees obtained at Simon Bolivar University (USB), Venezuela. In 2006, he obtained a PhD in Telematics Engineering from the Polytechnic University of Catalonia (UPC), Spain, with the distinction of Cum-laude. Between 2008 and 2010, she did two post-doctoral studies at the UPC and one at the University of Veracruzana, Mexico. In 2010, she was awarded an Erasmus Mundus scholarship from the European Community to carry out research activities at the University of Barcelona. She was a full professor, Dean of Postgraduate Studies and Coordinator of the Doctorate in Engineering of the USB. She also was the founder of the network and Applied Telematics Group (GRETA-USB). She is a Senior IEEE member of the societies: Women in Engineering, Communications and Engineering in Medicine and Biology (EMBS) and the President of the EMBS chapter of Ecuador. Between 2014 and 2017, she worked as a researcher in the PROMETEO Program of the Senescyt – Ecuador. She is currently a Principal Titular Professor of the Salesian Polytechnic University from Cuenca, Ecuador. Her research focuses on Wireless networks, sensor networks, telemedicine and remote monitoring. She has led and participated in more than 25 research projects. She has also published more than 160 articles in magazines and national and international congresses.

“Internet of things: A look to its research, innovation and development”

Every year the growth of the Internet of Things (IoT) exceeds the forecasts established by regulators and device manufacturers. During last year, IoT has gone from being a futuristic vision, sometimes with a certain degree of exaggeration, to a reality that is growing. This increase will generate changes in traditional businesses and, consequently, reduction of human intervention. IoT is the idea that everything can be connected anywhere and at any time. The concept can be applied to all sectors that involve the daily life of human beings, such as: personal care, housing, transportation, health, agriculture, e-government, education, automotive industry, e-commerce, business, among others. This talk presents a summary on research, innovation and development of existing IoT projects, their main challenges and obstacles.


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